Giza (not Ginza) by the Bay

Tokyo Big Sight

While working on my shots for the second Fragments of Tokyo there were a lot of attempts that simply wouldn’t work out. These mostly got posted on flickr under the monicker “Various Failures” (shamelessly stolen from The Swans album of the same name), which mostly prompted people to tell me to that they liked them, and that it wasn’t a failure.

What i was really trying to get across was that the shots were a failure in the context of what i wanted to show in the exhibition. Some simply happened too late, others didn’t really fit in with the general feeling, other needed to be re-attempted.

That exhibition was the first time that i’d really worked with a vision of what should be on the walls firmly fixed in my head. The process was in turn endlessly enjoyable, frustrating, and exhausting.

Tokyo Big Sight was an attempt to see a little differently through perspective and bring the pyramids to Tokyo Bay. As you can see above it didn’t really work out. There is definitely a time of day, a focal length where it could have been made to work… but that never coincided with any of my attempts to have it happen! There are, of course, numerous others that will never see the light of day.

One day i’ll go back and get it right… shame it’s such a pain in the arse to get to!

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Summer Acros

Turned on the tap, stuck my fingers in the water… that’s not 20ºC closer to 25ºC… hmm… let the tap run for a while… getting cooler… 23ºC. <brief moment of confusion> am i suppose wait until winter before developing again? This can’t be right!

Wanted to develop two rolls of Acros today, but the tap water is just too warm for what i usually do, and my Super Prodol was even warmer than the tap water. Seeing as the development time for Acros in Super Prodol is 4m15s @ 20ºC, it’s going to be close to impossible to control at 25ºC. Rodinal has a much longer dev time (~13m @ 20ºC), but i’m going to be guessing at the time.

The only solution (haha <cough>) is a splash of Rodinal (10ml) in a litre of tap water, give it a brief shake, and then let it sit for an hour, aka ‘stand development’. Sean has tried it with good results, and Jim used to swear by it…

Guess what? It works like a charm.

My cursory look at the negatives suggests that they are as well developed as my usual efforts, and the details in the shadows might be a little pulled up. Result!