The State of “Social”

Post from HN: How Does Mastodon Work?

Answer from me so far: it doesn’t.

Sadly i’m not sure it ever will. Leaving Twitter means leaving behind all the network effect that made the Twitter experience work.

One day an inflection point is going to come and people will migrate to a new platform. However, my guess is that will not happen for technical or organisational reasons, but just because. As much as it would be good to sell people on a messaging platform that is, among other things, virtuous, privacy respecting, user supported, censorship resistant (as Mastodon may well be…) if it doesn’t have the magic combination of simplicity and cool which periodically captures the zeitgeist… it doesn’t work.

I’ve managed to move the majority of my IM traffic to Signal… there are a few stragglers, and it wouldn’t surprise me to hear that it’s role in the communication of others is limited to catering to my diva-like demands! Why has that worked for personal communications, but failed for the broader, more scattershot social networking case?

The use case is different – on a platform like Twitter you curate followers / friends and accept that whatever to say will be broadcast to them all. This obviously means that you adapt your communication style to be less personal. In most cases a Twitter / Facebook / Instagram account becomes a simple means of promotion. Followers, if not the direct audience, act as a means of propagating or amplifying your message. If that network doesn’t not exist to fan out reaching a much wider “market” it’s not really fit for purpose.

It seems that more private (in many cases not in the cryptographic sense) interactions between natural groups (family, close friends, small teams) are migrating to closed chat rooms, most likely on platforms like WhatsApp, Facebook, etc. And Twitter / Facebook / Instagram feeds are slowly dissolving into a market place for both goods, ideas and attention, with the whole thing swirling around a sink hole of advertising intelligence / surveillance.

Sadly, i suspect that the implementation of Circles in Google+ came very close to synthesising something that captured a good balance. Fortunately people read the sociopathic writing on the wall – as bad a custodian of a social graph as Facebook has turned out to be, the only people that i can see giving them a run for their money in the ‘Totalitarian Information Megacorp’ / ‘Grim Meathook Future’ stakes are big G… and Amazon.

[A lot of this musing was brought to mind by seeing a Facebook ad on German TV that, and i kid you not, starts out with “F steht für unsere Fehler” (F stands for our failure), and then gets weirder.]

Advertisements

The Thirty-Five Timely & Untimely Deaths of Cumberland County

a76912_15457306fd7c4409a85eb82e6e2222c6~mv2I’m currently reading ‘The Thirty-Five Time & Untimely Deaths of Cumberland Country” by my long-time friend / collaborator / co-conspiritor Mason Ball, and am excited to report that it is terrifying… and terrifyingly good!

If you didn’t support him during the crowdfunding process on Unbound, you should go find yourself a copy in one of those bookstores of yore… or here, or Amazon. The writing is rich, keenly observed, textured, sombre, and playful – people die… a lot of people die, but somehow there is a current of humour (dark humour, dark as to appear black no doubt) running through it all.

One of the first questions that i had reading, was when Mason had spent enough time in Maine (where the tale is told) to develop a sense of the place… and it turns out it wasn’t just me:

Confession time: I have never been to Maine, where the book is set. Had I the funds I most definitely would have done but as it stood I had to make do with research, both online and in print; oh, and Google Earth and Google Street View were invaluable!

You can read the rest of the interview on Book Trails.

I’ll post a review when i’m done… but you should get a copy regardless.

Edit: Mason’s notes on buying the book:

Dj1aHRgWwAItoai